Call us: 0800 032 1702
Email Us: contact@freshcollection.co.uk

Stains and Care labels

Stains

  • The nature and age of any stain combined with the colour and construction of the fabric very much dictates the end result.

  • The dye in some fabrics is more soluble than the stain. Removing the stain will remove the dye.

  • Developed Stains: Spillages of drinks not containing strong dyes, such as lemonade and champagne, can be blotted away from fabrics and appear to have disappeared. However the residual sugar content is at work in your garment. Left unattended for a period of time, a yellow or brown stain will appear, this is due to oxidation of the sugar, similar to a half-eaten apple.

  • Early on in its life a stain will develop with the help of any heat source, such as pressing. The resulting developed stain can be permanent.

All stains are dealt with by hand prior to dry cleaning. Unless we have discussed with you the element of ‘Owners Risk’ we will operate within safety margins, limiting the end result in the removal of problematic stains.
Please kindly remember not to try to wash stains out prior to handing them to our experts to deal with as the H20 and chemicals can limit the effect of stain removal.

Care Labels

IMPORTANT: The ‘P’ with a circle is drycleaning symbol .   Please ensure you check labels accordingly and advise if item is to be cleaned for the first time, as some labels are not quite correct.

Machine wash
Max temp 30c
Min Agitation
Machine wash
Max temp 40c
Min Agitation
Machine wash
Max temp 530c
Min Agitation

Suitable for dry cleaning with specialist treatment, advice should be sought from a professional Dry Cleaner

Machine wash
Max temp 30c
Medium Agitation
Machine wash
Max temp 40c
Medium Agitation
Machine wash
Max temp 50c
Medium Agitation
Suitable for dry cleaning
Machine wash
Max temp 30c
Max Agitation
Machine wash
Max temp 40c
Max Agitation
Machine wash
Max temp 50c
Max Agitation
Suitable for dry cleaning using all solvents
Machine wash
Max temp 60c
Min Agitation
Machine wash
Max temp 70c
Min Agitation
Machine wash
Max temp 95c
Min Agitation
Suitable for dry cleaning using all solvents R113 and Hydrocarbon
Machine wash
Max temp 60c
Medium Agitation
Machine wash
Max temp 70c
Medium Agitation
Machine wash
Max temp 95c
Medium Agitation

Suitable for dry cleaning using solvents R113 and Hydrocarbon advice should be sought from a professional dry cleaner

Machine wash
Max temp 60c
Max Agitation
Machine wash
Max temp 70c
Max Agitation
Machine wash
Max temp 95c
Max Agitation
Do not dry clean

Hand wash only
Max Temp 40c
Handle with care

Do not wash be cautious when treaing in wet stage Do not use Chlorine based bleach Chlorine based bleach allowed
Do not tumble dry Can be tumble dried Can be tumble dried on a low heat setting Can be tumble dried on a high heat setting
Cool iron (max 110c) Warm iron (max 150c) Hot iron (max 200c) Do not iron
               

Moth Prevention

Protect Your Clothes from Moths
If you  have  any wool or wool blends in your closet, the flat brown clothes moth may be lurking. Because they favour the darkness, these pests are harder to detect than their larger, light-loving counterparts. And once you do find and dispose of them, the threat is not over. It's their larvae that do the most damage to our clothes.

Products available in stores include repellents, traps and sprays.
Steps:

  • Keep in mind that the clothes moth mainly fancies wool but has been known to munch, from time to time, on fur, cashmere and sometimes silk. You may find these materials as trims, woven fabrics and, of course, as sweaters, socks, gloves and boot linings.

  • Spot-clean any food stains from garments, as they may attract moths. Spray perfume or cologne on your skin or cotton garments, but avoid misting wool garments and knits.

  • Vacuum your home and closets regularly. Dispose of the bag's contents immediately - they may contain moth eggs and larvae.
    Dry-clean your moth-friendly clothes regularly to kill any new egg deposits. Place your wool accessories in airtight drawers or containers that include moth balls, cedar blocks or herbal sachets.

  • Store winter knits in a sturdy cedar chest, if at all possible. The oil from the wood is an effective moth repellent, and many manufacturers offer a guarantee against moth damage.

  • Hang cedar blocks from hangers that hold questionable garments, or switch to cedar hangers. Check your local home and garden store for moth repellents that you can spray directly on hanging clothes.

Tips:

  • Herbs, including lavender and rosemary, offer some protection against the clothes moth. Replace sachets every few months or reactivate with drops of essential oils.

  • Put new cedar blocks or moth balls in your closet and drawers at the beginning of each winter season.

Warnings:

  • Read the list of active ingredients in moth balls and moth repellents in spray form. The chemicals can be malodorous and could cause adverse skin reactions.
    If you notice bald patches in your carpet, it could be the work of moths or the carpet beetle. Check with an exterminator before the problem spreads and the population increases.

How to rid your home of clothing moths
The wormlike larvae of clothing moths feed on fabrics, clothing, carpets, rugs, furs, blankets, wool products, upholstery, piano felts and brushes - any materials of animal origin.
Steps:

  • Keep your house clean. Vacuum under furniture, along baseboards, in corners, in closets and around heater vents and draperies. Get rid of full vacuum cleaner bags promptly, as they may contain eggs, larvae or adult insects.

  • Remove empty bird, rodent and insect nests from your home’s perimeter, as they can also harbour moths.

  • Store out-of-season clothes properly. Dry-clean or wash them in hot water (above 120 degrees F for 20 to 30 minutes) before storing. Brush out any pockets, along the seams and under collars. Store clothes in airtight containers.

  • Place mothballs, flakes or crystals in airtight containers, and include a layer of paper to keep clothing from coming in contact with the insecticides. (These products contain naphthalene or paradichlorobenzene, which can fuse plastic, including plastic buttons, into fabric.) Vapors from the insecticides will build up in the container and slowly kill the moths.

Tips:

Clothing moths are not attracted to light.

  • Clothing moths flutter close by the area of infestation.

  • The chemicals in mothballs can cause skin, throat and eye irritation, and are toxic if swallowed or inhaled. Follow directions for use on the package.